WEEKEND TACTICAL JOBS: Executive Protection Agent

Man I don’t want to go back to my full-time job at google on Monday

What are WEEKEND TACTICAL JOBS?

I know what you are probably thinking right now, “don’t you have to be former Secret Service, Police or Special Forces to work as a bodyguard?” That may have been true 20 years ago but now just about anyone with the right training and licensing can find some part-time pick-up work in EP (EP = Executive Protection).

In fact – the majority of all EP work (in the US) is part-time, not many guys work full-time in EP and the few that do are on high profile jobs working for people like Bill Gates or Snoop Dog or they get on with one of the big EP firms.

But for the motivated guys who are willing to spend a few bucks, take a few courses and get licensed can generally find pick-up EP work or even a regular part-time EP job.

I worked part-time EP gigs for over 3 years (wile I was working an office gig during the dot-com boom), it even eventually lead to a full time EP job where I traveled all across the US for a year (after the dot-com bust and my stock portfolio was raped).

What Type of Training Do You Need for EP work

What Type of Training Do You Need for EP work?

Many states require some sort of license to work as an Executive Protection Agent, this may be an actual EP license, a PI (private investigator) license or just a security guard license. Some states do not require any license or training at all. But you can count on having to take some sort of firearms training if you want to work armed.

Check with your state to see what the licensing requirement are, the best wayto find out is by calling a local security company and asking them.

TRAINING
If you live in a state that requires a license for Executive Protection Agents then you will probably have to take some sort of mandatory training to receive a license. Depending on the state this can be as little as a four hour class or over a month of evening classes.

ADDITIONAL TRAINING
If you are in a state that doesn’t require specialized EP training then you will need to take an EP course nonetheless. You have the option of online training, attending a seminar locally or taking licensing course in a neighboring state that requires EP training.

Its up to you witch route you go in your EP training but eventually taking a ‘live’ EP course should be your goal. You can learn allot by taking an online EP course but acquiring EP muscle memory can only be learned by practicing with a team.

Even after taking your required licensing class or entry level EP training you still need to add a few things to your ‘EP skills toolbox’ to increase your chances of employment. Attending a Red Cross Basic first aid and CPR course should be the very next class you take, make sure this is a class where you will receive your Basic first aid and CPR card.

You need to learn CPR in case your liquor flask has a heart attack

After you start getting some work you should recycle your EP job cash into more classes like advanced firearms training, tactical emergency medicine and tactical driving. Additional training will increase your chances of getting more EP work. Plus, they are hot-shit fun classes to take, especially tactical driving.

A NOTE ON FIREARMS
If you want to work in armed EP work (believe it or not, a huge amount of EP work is unarmed) you will need to acquire a concealed carry weapon permit (CCW). And even if you are not carrying a firearm you will still need a CCW if you conceal collapsible batons, knives or even in some cases pepper spray. Generally speaking you should get a CCW no matter what, plus it will be another thing to put on your EP job app.

Depending on the state you live in CCW requirements can be as easy as just buying a shoulder holster (Alaska) to completely impossible (like Hawaii). If you live in a Shall-Issue state you will probably have to show proof of some sort of firearms training. If you live in a May-Issue state you will have to go through the security company you work for to get a CCW.

Here is some info on the requirements for being issued a CCW in the US: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concealed_carry_in_the_United_States

If you wish to be an EP driver you may have to have a limo license or CDL.

WHERE TO FIND PART-TIME EP WORK

First of all you will need to write an EP resume for yourself, take your current resume and add your newly acquired EP related training (place it above your non-EP education). Because you don’t have any EP experience at this point cut the employment history job summaries in half (recruiters will only scan over your past jobs if you don’t have past EP experience).

If you are former military or have been employed in any related vocations expand those areas. In your cover letter make it clear that you are looking for part-time work and you are serious about starting a part-time career in EP.

For those of you who live in a medium to large city finding part-time EP work is just a matter of dropping off your resume to all of the security companies in your area and waiting for a call. Companies that offer EP services will be listed under “security services” or “security guard services” in the yellow pages.

If you live in a small town your chances of finding paid part-time EP work is unlikely, but you may be able to find some unpaid part-time EP work (see below).

But no matter where you live the first EP work you get will be sporadic at best, after you have shown yourself to be competent, responsible and reliable (that is the most important employee ‘skill’ for most security companies) the gigs will come more steadily.

UNPAID PART-TIME EP WORK

After you are licensed and trained-up one of the options for gaining some experience is to find somewhere you can volunteer as an Executive Protection Agent.

I know several guys that started out in EP by going to a local battered women’s shelter and volunteering to protect battered women from their piece of shit abusive husbands and boyfriends.

This will consist of escorting battered women when they return to there homes to pick up their belongings, providing residential EP (sitting in your car in-front of a house) and ‘real’ EP work escorting them around town.

Not only is this a great way to gain some experience, you will be helping someone out. Look in the yellow pages under “women’s shelters” and check with your local churches. You may need to get bonded to do this type of volunteering, also make sure that you will come under the shelters liability insurance.

GEAR

GEAR

CLOTHING
The first thing you will need is a decent dark navy blue suit, make sure the jacket is roomy enough to conceal a weapon. You will want to get one in summer weight even if you live somewhere cold.

If you are working outdoors you can just wear a jacket if it is cold out, but when you are running around with someone in a heated building 10 minutes later you will sweat your ass off in a wool suit (I learned this the hard way).

For the lower profile jobs just pick out something you already own that will make you blend in and run an iron over it. Avoid wearing flashy ‘hip’ clothing, Glock t-shirts and jewelry (including your wedding ring).

SHOES

 

great for EP and strippin’

When you wear a suit, wear a comfortable pair of leather shoes – I wore orthopedic kicks. For low-profile dress assignments just wear whatever shoes you normally wear but give them a scrub with Woolite and a damp washcloth. Do not wear cowboy boots or slip-on shoes.

HOLSTER
If your are working a standing or walking EP gig a strong side belt holster is your best choice. I recommend leather holsters because they become more comfortable the longer you use them. I also suggest that you have a thumb-break or some sort of manually operated retention on whatever holster you choose.

This isn’t a SWAT team job so the chances of you “quick drawing” are far less than your gun falling out wile sitting in your car or someone trying to snag it.

For residential EP, EP driver or any other EP work where you are sitting down 99% of the time you should pick up a cross-draw belt holster or shoulder holster. Again I suggest that you buy a leather holster, especially if you’re choose a shoulder holster.

FIREARMS

FIREARMS

On the subject of EP firearms and firearm selection in general I could write a 184 part article so I will keep it simple for you.

Use the handgun that you like and are most proficient with.

Also please don’t carry 4 guns, twelve mags and 9 knives – you will scare your client and give EP a bad name.

OTHER WEAPONS
I have used ASP batons, stun guns, pepper spray, knives and even a baseball bat when doing un-firearmed EP (yes, I made up the word “un-firearmed”). The ASP baton is probably my favorite non-firearm weapon for EP work. If you decide to use any of the above make sure to get certified and keep your CCW on you.

OTHER
Carry a mini-flashlight, 2 good ‘click’ open pens, notepad, 100 bucks in cash (small bills), a business card from the company you work for (with a 24-7 contact number), cell phone, 2-way radio (if you work in a team), folding knife, energy bar, capri-sun (if you have the room) and a pair of sunglasses.

Some guys who work residential EP, EP driver or lo-profile (casual clothing) gigs carry a man-bag. If you use one get it in black and not coyote brown, tan or cammo.

NON-WEAPON, WEAPONS
Back when I started in EP they didn’t have things like tactical flashlights with impact heads or metal pens like the surefire EP-01. Now EP guys stateside are now using these tools in places where they are not allowed to carry traditional weapons.

CREDENTIALS
If you are working in a state that issues EP or security licenses you will already have a state picture ID. But many guys also carry an EP police style badge, I had a badge that I carried on a belt clip holder (in my pocket, not on my belt). These are great for identifying yourself quickly and a must-have if you are working with a firearm, be professional at all times with your EP badge.

This does not make you a cop, it is just an ID

If you do buy an EP badge do not carry it in a badge wallet so you can flash it every time you pay for a Big Mac. Only show it when identifying yourself.

BUSINESS CARDS
Have a stack of business cards made up for yourself with a skype number and an email address.

FRINGE BENEFITS

Besides having a cool part-time job working as an Executive Protection Agent this line of work has many fringe benefits that you wouldn’t have in a ‘normal’ job.

FREE GEAR (SORT OF)
If you are employed as an Executive Protection Agent any gear (including firearms) and tactical training classes that you take are tax-deductible expenses. Don’t attempt to figure this out yourself, save your receipts and hire an accountant. I used an accountant that specialized in doing returns for cops.

CCW IN MAY-ISSUE STATES
When I was working in EP I had CCW’s for notoriously hard to get CCW states like Delaware and New Jersey (it was pretty much impossible to get a CCW in New Jersey then). I know guys now that have been sworn in as special police in Washington DC so they can legally carry a handgun there.

I also had PI and Armed Security licenses in 18 states, and the best part was – I didn’t pay for shit, the companies I worked for paid for everything.

This is pretty much only way your wallet will ever see a CCW in most May-Issue states without any hassle or massive personal expense. If a security company you work for has a lawyer put in the paperwork along with the company vouching for your need to carry a concealed firearm as a job requirement you can almost count on getting issued one.

WHAT THIS PART TIME TACTICAL JOB IS NOT

Unlike Executive Protection Agents in the movies and on TV you wont be protecting big time movie stars or jumping over cars with your piece drawn yelling “freeze you jive-turkey!” The majority of EP work is just walking around, sitting around and sometimes flying around.

That’s not to say EP is uneventful or you won’t ever see any action, it is probably one of the most interesting and challenging jobs you will ever have.

Just don’t expect to get in shoot-outs with Russian gangsters or bang rock star groupies in green rooms.

CAN I GO FULL TIME IN EP WORK?

If I wrote “yes” on one side of a coin and “no” on the other, then flipped the coin in the air, whatever side it landed on would be your answer.

Finding full time EP work is pretty much luck and networking, most of the few full-time EP gigs go to guys with high-speed backgrounds, years of experience or who are in the loop. The full-time EP job market is not unlike the “bubbas club” in civilian contractor circles.

But I do know a few guys besides myself that have gone from part-time EP to full-time gigs so it is not impossible. I even know one guy that didn’t have a military or police background that went from part-time EP work in the states to a high speed PSD gig in the Middle East.

So keep adding training to your EP skill-box and keep in touch with everyone you work with (be a nice guy, because people do favors for people they like in EP) and maybe you can change careers.

If not – no sweat off of your back, you will still have an bad-ass part-time gig that will get your mind off of your weekday TPS report writing.

In Conclusion…

EP is a great option for guys who live in a decent sized city that could even lead to a new high-speed career. But even if you don’t go full-time, EP makes for an interesting and cool part-time job for high speed guys stuck in a low-speed job that they can’t quit.

Authors Note: If there are any active stateside EP guys reading this please chime in with your suggestions for guys looking to break into part-time EP work.

I not a lawyer or accountant, so check your local laws before doing anything in the above article. Read our Disclaimer here (ha-ha, now you cant sue me)

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~James G
Founder – Editor in Chief

James G is a Veteran Civilian Contractor who has worked in the Middle East and Southeast Asia for way too long. He spends his off time in Indonesia and Virginia getting drunk, shooting guns and writing poorly written articles.

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60 thoughts on “WEEKEND TACTICAL JOBS: Executive Protection Agent”

  1. 200 views and no comments guys?

    What do you think about this new series?

    ~James G

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  2. Keep it going. We’re taking notes.

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  3. Thanks Dude!

    ~James G

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  4. I lucked into a couple of EP gigs back in the day by virtue of where I worked ( a movie studio in NC). So I can definately agree on the networking.

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  5. Sure, networking is important no matter if you work in EP part-time or you are a plumer

    ~James G

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  6. I got my experience working for a police department that had an EP team. I have since left and worked two civilian EP gigs. One was just staying at the clients home overnight. The other was a two week gig. Since I’m doing PI work the people I work for used me because of my training and background. I agree with the article James. Some very good info. I kinda went to the driving side however. Driving is my nitch. I got certified as a driving instructor. So everytime we had a detail, I was usually the driver.

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  7. Good tips James.

    I found it ironic that you said it’s weekend work. It’s kind of like the college girls flying to another city to be a stripper, porn actress, or escort. The ironic part is when I was doing some close protection work on the weekends, it was for two strippers. Funny part was I knew one of the strippers since the age of five, and didn’t know she was a stripper.

    We were both like, “WOW, you do this one the weekends for extra money?”

    Ironic eh?

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  8. I kinda went to the driving side however. Driving is my nitch. I got certified as a driving instructor. So everytime we had a detail, I was usually the driver.  (Quote This Comment)

    Driving is the best gig in EP, less BS with the client, you can eat and smoke more often, ect…

    Good tips James.I found it ironic that you said it’s weekend work. It’s kind of like the college girls flying to another city to be a stripper, porn actress, or escort. The ironic part is when I was doing some close protection work on the weekends, it was for two strippers. Funny part was I knew one of the strippers since the age of five, and didn’t know she was a stripper.We were both like, “WOW, you do this one the weekends for extra money?”Ironic eh?  (Quote This Comment)

    I did some EP work with strippers also, so did one of the other writers here – Plus you have, how should I say… many side benefits to protecting strippers

    That’s one I forgot to mention, almost all towns have a strip joint – another place to find work

    ~James G

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  9. don’t forget to recycle some of that cash into language courses, I can speak english and French, its so friggin handy for travelling, next up, Russian, German, and maybe Arabic

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  10. Sure language skills will definitely help get your resume to the top of the stack – I would suggest learning an Asian language

    ~James G

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    1. I’ll be sure to add a few of those languages

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  11. Thanks for the article. I live in California and it’s hard to get a ccw here. I’m about 40 minutes from San Francisco. I have taken some EP training classes with Blackwater and I put myself through the police academy in order to bolster my resume. James …I’m sure glad I have you as a friend on FB or else I might have been in the dark about EP work longer than I wanted to…Thanks again.!

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  12. Thanks James G!

    I’m very interested in learning more about this. I look forward to reading more about EP/PSD jobs, and familiarizing myself with the requirements to get involved in this line of work. Thanks again for yet another informative article.
    -Justin

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  13. Hoping not to sound like a complete wince, but with all these courses try and pick up an executive / personal assistants course/workshop also.

    The amount of advance work you’ll find yourself doing in the corporate world, it’ll help when trying to understand your clients intent and what he/she has going on. As a plus, you won’t stand out like a broken thumb in the office environment.

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  14. You may pick up some of this work around clubs and casinos. Talk to the talent booking agents as many acts require some kind of personal security.

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  15. very cool guys. I have been interested in this very topic for years but had absolutely noooo idea that it could be done part time, or even considered without a high speed/military background (which I do not have). good advice on places to peddle your services as well.
    there may be hope for me yet.

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  16. I like the series and your magazine alot. I have very little experience in security work compared to you guys , but even at 49 years old , Im willing to learn. Any input is welcome and I always appreciate good advice, even if itsnot what I want to hear.

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  17. I did want to add one thing. I recently enlisted in the Texas State Guard Maritime Regiment and Ill be training with various Law Enforcement Agencies and doing alot of training, i.e. H2H and surveillance and lots of stuff dealing with catastrophic events. Its an unpaid, purely volunteer position, but it comes with alot of benefits. The State of Texas has gone above and beyond as far as securing our border with Mexico and it looks like it will only snowball with time. Im somewhat trained already, as Im a veteran, I have worked as an armed and unarmed officer and Im a martial artist, but I am hopeful to get out of my current career in aviation and just do security work. Aviation is great as far as pay. But, it comes with a price, like having to work with some of the biggest “douche bags” in history. I dont expect to soar in the private security arena, I just want to be part of a team of professionals and make a difference. I just thought I’d throw that info out there to you younger fellas that might be looking around. I know that some of the schools out there are pretty pricey and maybe something like Im doing will help someone else. Either way, I hope I can someday work with some of ya’ll, if not, God Bless and stay safe!

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  18. Great article James….

    been working this kind of EP for about 3 and a half years now and you summed things up very nicely.

    Overall I would advise that anyone looking to get into it does their homework first. Check out the companies in your area before you send in a resume and make sure they are the kinds of places you want to work.
    the company I work for highlights EP and protection work on their website ads and whenever the boss posts job announcements, but this is actually only about 2% of our job. The other 98% is hospitality security….bars, clubs, events and hotels. we have had lots of folks think they were getting in to “the shit” only to find them selves guarding a cash box at an auction for 12 hours.

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    1. Great article James….been working this kind of EP for about 3 and a half years now and you summed things up very nicely.Overall I would advise that anyone looking to get into it does their homework first. Check out the companies in your area before you send in a resume and make sure they are the kinds of places you want to work.the company I work for highlights EP and protection work on their website ads and whenever the boss posts job announcements, but this is actually only about 2% of our job. The other 98% is hospitality security….bars, clubs, events and hotels. we have had lots of folks think they were getting in to “the shit” only to find them selves guarding a cash box at an auction for 12 hours.  (Quote This Comment)

      Actually Jason, Im kinda looking for that type of work. I have a little security work in my background, but Im a helo mech by trade. It does pay six figures in country, but its not what I want to do anymore. I have always wanted to do something different, just stayed in aviation for the money. But I guess its hard to explain why I would give that up for standing guard on a potted plant or babysitting somebodies limo somewhere, but I would like to do something like that. Im most likely too old to be out fighting Terrorist , but even “grumpy old men” like myself have some sort of purpose .

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  19. Actually Jason, Im kinda looking for that type of work. I have a little security work in my background, but Im a helo mech by trade. It does pay six figures in country, but its not what I want to do anymore. I have always wanted to do something different, just stayed in aviation for the money. But I guess its hard to explain why I would give that up for standing guard on a potted plant or babysitting somebodies limo somewhere, but I would like to do something like that. Im most likely too old to be out fighting Terrorist , but even “grumpy old men” like myself have some sort of purpose .  

    Curt,

    I hear about wanting to do something different. I am a firm believer that if your going to work you should love, or at least like what it is you do. I enjoy the work I do for the most part but after 3 years I am getting worn thin on babysitting drunk douchebags. But when I get the occasional EP gig or something remotely interesting I am very happy.

    To be honest with you I found my job on Craig’s list in my city. Give that a try and see whats up. If your city is like mine you will have to wade through the jobs wanting former Military/Law Enforcement; Secret or higher clearance preferred etc… that only want to pay you 11.00$/ hour but occasionally you find a winner.

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  20. Good little write up! I actually got started doing ep work from working in nightclubs. I will vouch 100% for sharpening and adding to your skill set. I have taken a ton of classes and various types of training from MMA to specialized hand to hand, language, driving and tac med classes. All of which at some point have come in handy, besides looking good on the resume. I would add staying up on current events and politics. I have had details where I am to blend in as part of the group or even a company executive. Knowing how to carry a conversation and being in the know is good ticket to success.

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  21. hey im about to come off 4 yrs of active duty service as a combat engineer in the army(basically just demo work) just wondering if theres a good nationwide company to try my luck at or if anyone could point me in the right direction for the most reputable courses for EP work thanks

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  22. I would be happy to assist people who are seriously interested to further their (EP) training and education.
    1) executive protection 2) PSD personal security detail 3) bodyguard etc are not the same and these words can not be interchanged. Most training EP schools in the US and abroad place a large portion of their training on firearms which should be the last thing and not the first.
    Quality needed: The skills necessary to protect a client-means not only physical abilities, but also the intellect; emotional qualities; marketing strategy; and other non-relevant trades.
    * A sense of humor good enough to see the bright side when nothing goes according to plan.
    * A well balanced view of life in general.
    * A sense of dedication to either your principle or your profession, you choose.
    * Patience-your tasks are generally 90 percent boredom, mostly spent waiting.
    * The endurance and determination to go the distance in training and in the field.
    * Appearing more of an executive than a protector is often an asset in terms of low profile.
    The Threat:
    Preliminary to the establishment of a program of executive protection is defining what or whom we are protecting someone from. it is very likely ( depending somewhat upon your geographic and political location…more…

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  23. Hello everyone my name is Mitchell I’m 30yrs old I ‘m currently working as a Police Officer but my ultimate dream is working in Executive Protection/Bodyguard work. I Have been a cop now for six years in good standards. Its hard for me to fine work, I live in va and have posted my resume on many sites if anyone can help get in the field i would great appreciated.

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  24. Once again, a very well written and informative article. Keep up the great work!!!

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  25. If you’ve read these articles you would know that taking lots of training and networking are keys to your success. Being in Virginia, you should be able to take a lot of training and network.

    Police Officer

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  26. Excellent info. Anybody here know of a reputable operation in Metro-ATL,GA?

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  27. Thanks again for an interesting read. I’m actually researching this field and looking forward to entering in it shortly. I have a friend who is in the field in the NY area and, he said a lot of luck and networking to get in. I have a military background, shortly finishing my B.A. and several years in the security field. I was wondering if classes such as Wicklander and R.L. Oatman are worth taking if you have the time and money. Please let me know. Thanks for the advice with strippers and batterd woman for an easy way to get started. Not a bad place to start.

    Respectfully,

    Chris S.
    New Jersey

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  28. Outstanding info! just stumbled onto this site, and am sure I will be back. Just looking to break into the field as well. Live in Southern Ca., former military, already have a CCW and hoping the proximity to L.A. will come in handy. look forwards to reading more articles.

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  29. 200 views and no comments guys?

    What do you think about this new series?

    ~James G

    Well written article and right on as far as I can tell. I was fortunate to get foot in door overseas and learn PSD from some of the best. I was basic Marine, nothing hi-speed but the most important thing I feel guys can learn is just come into training and keep your mouth shut and perform. For some reason, in this line of work….the more someone talks about how Ninja and HighSpeed/LowDrag they are, these are the ones to steer clear of. Number one is be physically fit. Remember, the more skills you bring to the table, they companies will PAY YOU to attend training. Not the other way around.
    Executive protection is glorified baby-sitting like you mentioned. Very good point in volunteering to help at women’s shelters. Help others and gain experience. Looking forward to more bro. Well written piece. S/F

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  30. Well proffesor, I am taking notes, I can’t decide between this and being a cop

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  31. I’m in NC I recently ers out of military. Its my dream to do work. I train hard on whateveri do. I’m just alone and really am lost on where to start.

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  32. Shawn, ESI can be paid for by the GI bill, I loved this article and the comments, but look in to ESI, I’m about to go here mid may for some 25-30 days….yes languages are a plus.

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  33. Whats going on ?
    Im an Active duty 0331 in the Marines. Im about to get out the Corps and im currently attending Mira Costa college. They have a program thats legit, its called CAPS (certified armed protection specialist) The instructors are every knowledgeable. Im getting my Guard card and open carry permit for California State. I have applyed with Gavin De Becker. I am looking for work inside Cali. From what I have herd day trips into Mexico are worst then Afghan.

    Well if anyone has any networking advise please hit me up (Edit: please do not post emails) later.

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  34. Hello everyone,
    I just recently got out of the army and I’ve been working a security gig doesn’t pay well and I work a lot ( to much for what I make). I have taken a few classes here and there and just got my conceal to carry permit. So my question is doe’s anyone know of any companies in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin/ chicago Illinois area that would be hiring. I just got my first part time gig and would like to find more work like this. If you guys have any tips please help me out. Thanks

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  35. Pretty “down-to-earth” article and your views are pretty much on point. They should incorporate some of those issues in EP seminars and classes. Former MP, then CID, Retired from the PD, spent 2 years in Kuwait/Egypt as a PMC/PSC during the Gulf War, mostly working for DOS. Gearing up for the 3013 Presidential Inauguration and festivities the week following the swearing in on MK Day. Worked it in 09 also. I did not get home once during the entire week, had enough clothing to make the necessary changes, ate energy bars and drank gator-aid. Up, way before of dawn until the parties and Inaugurations Balls ended in the wee morning hours. Bottom line… cleared almost 8 grand in a l-0-n-g week.
    Getting older now and mostly just drive the Suburbans, I know the DC streets very well..
    Again, thanks and good luck to all ;)

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    1. Roadking,

      I live in the DC area and worked the 2009 Inauguration also. If you get this message, let me know so we can network and possibly meet up.

      Pretty “down-to-earth” article and your views are pretty much on point. They should incorporate some of those issues in EP seminars and classes. Former MP, then CID, Retired from the PD, spent 2 years in Kuwait/Egypt as a PMC/PSC during the Gulf War, mostly working for DOS. Gearing up for the 3013 Presidential Inauguration and festivities the week following the swearing in on MK Day. Worked it in 09 also. I did not get home once during the entire week, had enough clothing to make the necessary changes, ate energy bars and drank gator-aid. Up, way before of dawn until the parties and Inaugurations Balls ended in the wee morning hours. Bottom line… cleared almost 8 grand in a l-0-n-g week.
      Getting older now and mostly just drive the Suburbans, I know the DC streets very well..
      Again, thanks and good luck to all

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      1. Steve,
        I hate to sound like an ass, but have gotten a slew of e-mails by guys looking for jobs who are not licensed to conceal in MD, DC and VA ???.
        I am not an employer, just making social comments on this article with some of my [factual] background info so you don’t think I am working at the mall selling shoes, not that there anything wrong with that. Most of my associates are retired cops or federal officers, who “carry concealed” under the HR218 bill passed by President Bush. Please feel to e-mail me [email protected] if you fall under that category.

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  36. Im in NC and do a lot of ep work. I think you summed up the job pretty well. EP I a great gig its just getting your foot in the door thats hard.

    200 views and no comments guys?

    What do you think about this new series?

    ~James G

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    1. Thanks for dropping me the line Steve, I responded back and we will hook up in the DC area next month. Comments are slow in coming Shawn……
      Everybody is waxing the new 2012 Suburbans.
      Id’ do mine too, but it’s snowing up here in northern Maryland and I’m not pulling it out of my garage to get dirty ;)
      Merry Christmas Steve & Shawn

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  37. I see people are lacking ccw permit in va, ect. I’ve git mine in NC which has reciprocity. Im also licensed as Private investigator associate which you need in nc in order to do ep work. If any jobs come up and you need an experienced ep specialist please let me know. Thanks and happy holidays

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  38. Steve, I might have to leave until the 17 Jan, just in time for the Inauguration. I won’t know until this coming weekend if I have to “go and accompany” them to DC from SF.
    I posted a picture below

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  41. Sorry about that, but the website does not turn it in to a “clickable link”
    I guess you have to copy and paste???

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    1. I got the photos – cool pics.

      No problem about having to leave, I’m up in the SF bay area also, working there quite a bit, so maybe we could meet up then. If not, I’m sure our paths will cross sometime. The EP industry is pretty small.

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  42. I recently received my private investigator associate license in nc. Ive taken ep course at Academi, armed and unarmed course in nc which I am qualified expert on remmington 870 and glock 23. Since my first post here I have also aquired red cross first aid training and took a defensive driving course. Ive done a couple of gigs and love this job. Is there any advice or anything you can offer to help me in my success in this career. I am very grateful.

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    1. Hey Shawn,

      All I can recommend is what other people have said and that is to Network. You can join all kinds of EP groups on-line and on Yahoo. There are also paid job subscription service websites that list security jobs for a small fee. 90% of jobs are through word of mouth though. Once you do a great job on one detail, then you will get recommended on other details. You may also want to consider traveling/moving to a bigger city where EP agents are used more often.

      Good luck,
      Steve

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  43. Thanks for dropping me the line Steve, I responded back and we will hook up in the DC area next month. Comments are slow in coming Shawn……
    Everybody is waxing the new 2012 Suburbans.
    Id’ do mine too, but it’s snowing up here in northern Maryland and I’m not pulling it out of my garage to get dirty
    Merry Christmas Steve & Shawn

    Thankyou and happy holidays

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  44. this is great stuff fellas. I’m 25
    & live in the hospitable state of
    MS. I researched EP to basic security
    not long ago. this article is the shortest,
    yet most informative I have come across. ha.
    I was told to forget about it, being as I have no training.
    broken hearted to hear this from the most respectable person in my family, I tried 2 clear my head of the silly notion of EP PI or even
    basic security work ever being a real possibility for me.

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  45. I left high school early, & was accepted into a military style 6month program. mostly this was for troubled youths who were sent there as last stop before prison deal. though I finished my basic academics in 3 months, college courses were available to those who passed state test first try. (very few received this opportunity). I completed myclasses & volunteered hundreds of hours community service long after I met the required hours to graduate. some guys were allowed leave early, on the condition they joined the service. I choose wrong, not joining the few men I respected there & choosing civilian life over the cadres yells & 45° angle folds on my blanket, & PT I said I hated but choose 2 lead our warm ups & runs anyway. I chose hard labor in the end. regret it most dearly. I understand what protection work Intel’s.that its not all action & evasive driving. but have I blew my chance? I’m teaching muself “better” spanish & am collecting data on MS available licenses a atleast some basic courses. I’m free w/o spouse or children to affect any decisions I make. should I take off 2 the army? focus on localized PI work? iv taking my first aid & cpr classes, though prolly needs do again soon. getting a ccw can be fairly simple here, or use to be. I have no intrest in law enforcement outside the MP position I debated on these past few years. no offense to officers anywhere, I respect any man making honorable decisions. ill have a file completed soon on MS with basic layout of licenses to qualify for & any training programs easily available.

    lots think about after reading this.

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    1. Troy,
      Happened to see your messages in my inbox. There are quite a few guys who have made it in the EP business without a military/federal background. But you will definitely have to take a lot of training at high end (and expensive) schools. You will need to leave where your living and move to a city that needs EP guys. I have a friend who moved from Alabama to DC area to do this type of work. You will need to get training in foreign languages, Advanced security schools, medic/EMT, Driving schools, PI schools if you want to move into that career and anything else that will help you, then network with as many people as you can. As long as you don’t have a felony, you have a chance to move up into the EP world, if you have the talents and training that are a good fit with what we do.

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  46. I just came across this article and was just looking for some input on ESI training. I have no backround at all in this industry but i have always wanted to get into it. I was just wondering if this would be a good move to make. I have already enrolled and have the money set back to take the 28 day EP course which starts in two weeks. So if anyone has some advice for me that would be much appreciated.

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    1. Hey Billy,

      ESI is definitely one of the top EP schools out there… there are others that are cheaper and shorter such as EPI which is their competition. EPI will also allow you to register for your PPS license if you choose to work in the Virginia/DC metro area. ESI is a very comprehensive course though and is well worth the money, especially once you graduate and start working on details. Good luck with your training and go in with the right preparation and attiude

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      1. Thanks for your input steve that helps alot.

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  47. I just found this article this morning, and wanted to say I thought that not only was the article really well done, but the questions and answers that followed are very good as well. I have been very fortunate in my EP and PSD career, and have worked in over 90 countries worldwide.

    When you’re looking for work and getting your certifications and training, don’t overestimate the value of taking a uniformed security position as an entry-level job, especially if it’s with a company that also provides EP. Uniformed security work certainly isn’t very glamourous, but you can get some initial training, have something industry related to put on the resume, and most importantly, it can lead to vital networking opportunities.

    Volunteer work is another good way to gain experience. I was working uniformed security at a meat-processing plant Kansas when I volunteered my time with a local bonding company. This lead to a full-time job as their bail-enforcement agent and private investigator.

    I was working as a uniformed security officer/EMT at a hotel/casino outside of Las Vegas when I decided to join the Army and become a Ranger. I turned 26 in basic training, so I was quite a bit older than most of the other recruits, but it was a good move for me. I got a lot of great experience and training, as well as a significant amount of college money.

    The EP industry is like any other, it takes a lot of hard work, dedication, and a bit of luck never hurts to make it to the top, but it can be done. Whatever job you have, try to do the very best you can. Show up for work early, be prepared, have your shoes shined, don’t chew gum during the interview, keep your fingernails trimmed, speak well, communicate effectively, keep good records, and develop your network.

    EP has been my life goal and career choice since I was in high-school. It has been a long and difficult road, but I am glad I stuck with it. I have had a chance to travel to a lot of places that most people will never get to see, I have worked with some great people (and some not so great), and it has been financially rewarding for me.

    I am in the process of transitioning from full-time EP to full-time instruction, and have opened a small training school, Rally Point LLC, in NOVA. We have recently gotten registered by the Commonwealth to provide the 60 plus hours of training for the Personal Protection Specialist course, which VA requires to work EP. We are also able to provide the firearms training VA requires to work armed, and we will be providing evasive driving and high-risk PSD training.

    Thanks for posting this, and thanks for taking the time to read it. Good luck to everyone out there in their search for EP work. I hope you will find it as challenging, rewarding, and fun as I have.

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  48. Ever heard of brawnstone in canton Ohio is that a good school? Thanks and even with a CCw does that give u the ability to carry a rifle to

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  49. But for the motivated guys who are willing to spend a few bucks, take a few courses and get licensed can generally find pick-up EP work or even a regular part-time EP job.These are great for identifying yourself quickly and a must-have if you are working with a firearm, be professional at all times with your EP badge. Bodyguard

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